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“The Wandering Train” by Stefan Grabinski

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Diabolique Magazine’s excursion into the world of original horror fiction continues with this month’s installment, “The Wandering Train” by Stefan Grabinski.

As time goes on, unknown wonders of culture begin to rise from obscurity, connecting to a global audience. Stefan Grabinski was originally dismissed in his own country of Poland due to being a writer in a place that did not understand the literature he was creating. Born in the small town of Kamionka Strumilowa, Poland on 26 February 1887, Grabinski became fascinated by the supernatural at a young age. Working as a teacher to support his living, his passion was writing, and his work came in the form of a unique breed of strange fantasy, concerned with psychological, philosophical, and metaphysical matters. He proposed to refer to his fiction as “psychofantasy” or “metafantasy.”

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For “The Wandering Train” and other works by Stefan Grabinski, The Dark Domain is an excellent volume of his short stories, translated by Mroslaw Lipinski. [Click the image]

He originally began publishing under the pseudonym Stefan Zalny, but went unnoticed until his official debut, Na wgorzu roz (On the Hill of Roses) in 1918. His work was unlike any Polish literature that had been published prior, and it began to catch the attention of several critics. He continued writing short stories and several novels until his death from complications due to tuberculosis on November 12th, 1936. He had been sickly for much of his life, but before his death, he expressed bitter complaints about never receiving real recognition in his home country.

Yet, as the years went on, people began to take notice. In the late 1950s, Poland began to read the author, designating him the “Polish Poe.” Translators began to bring Grabinski’s work to readers in new places. Filmmakers and other artists began to adapt his stories or cite him as influential to their work.

In this installment of the EXHUMATION COLLECTION Diabolique Magazine is very excited to be featuring “The Wandering Train,” taken from Grabinski’s most successful short story collection in Poland, Demon Ruchu (The Motion Demon), translated by Miroslaw Lipinski.

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About Madeleine Koestner

Madeleine Koestner is the former managing editor of Diabolique. She is a writer, filmmaker, and she plays the ukulele, performing songs as Erik Leafinson, a Viking past life of hers who was a major disappointment to his father, Leif Ericson. Madeleine has been involved with horror all over the country but is currently based in New York City, where she continues to not make any sense at all ever all the time.

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